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The Physics Olympics

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The Physics Olympics

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Game, set, and match. It’s that time again, once year Towson high students take to the science wing in teams of two to decide who will represent our school during the annual physics games. Lead by Mr. Joquemans, the teams are given three challenges to test their mental and physical abilities to help decide which of the eighteen students are best suited to be taken to the games.  , set, and match. It’s that time again, once year Towson high students race to the science wing in teams of two to decide who will represent our school during the annual physics games. Lead by Mr. Joquemans, the teams are given three challenges to test their mental and physical abilities to help decide which of the eighteen students are best suited to be taken to the games.

Mr. Joquemans a physics teacher working for Towson shared with me his favorite memory of being apart of the Physics Olympics. “I remember one year we had a challenge where we had to build a rocket and with little time left they were all running around screaming their heads off. It was hilarious!” What draws kids to try out for the physics Olympics was not just a love of science, though some students like Juliana Salehi and Caroline Seitz are planning on entering a career science, but a love of games. The challenges are fun-filled and make you think on your feet.

It was interesting to see how many students were drawn there based on a slight interest in the physical build challenges. When asked a majority of the students like Tyler Thorton a senior at Towson high said, “I really like to go to Mr. Joquemans class because we’re always doing something cool. Last year, the physics Olympics was a lot of fun for me and the rest of the teams so this year I decided to come back and try out again.” Tyler wasn’t alone, many of his fellow seniors and some juniors had said that trying out for the physics Olympics was something fun to do after school with friends. But, while the driving factor bringing students to the physics Olympics was the promising combination of physics and pizza, there were a happy group of students who aspire to graduate and join the scientific community. Student Caroline Seitz, a junior at Towson, said, “When I graduate I want to work in research. I have always loved science and have never been ashamed to call it my favorite class.” Caroline was not the only one with aspirations in science. Student Juliana Salehi is applying to work in a research laboratory for an internship in her senior year and said, “Everything is physics is interesting to me, and I think I thrive when working with the challenges that involve abstract thinking. I think that the physics Olympics will be a fun way to get more experience in physics and help me in the future.”Student Juliana Salehi is applying to work in a research laboratory for an internship in her senior year and said, “Everything is physics is interesting to me, and I think I thrive when working with the challenges that involve abstract thinking. I think that the physics Olympics will be a fun way to get more experience in physics and help me in the future.”Student Juliana Salehi is applying to work in a research laboratory for an internship in her senior year and said, “Everything is physics is interesting to me, and I think I thrive when working with the challenges that involve abstract thinking. I think that the physics Olympics will be a fun way to get more experience in physics and help me in the future.”

In the first challenge, the teams of two were given four pieces of paper, five thin wooden stirring sticks, a short spout of tape and an egg. The challenge is for the teams to build a structure that will protect their egg from the unknown mass. The challenge is for the teams to create a structure that will protect their egg from the unknown mass.  The challenge is for the teams to build a structure that will protect their egg from the unknown mass.

The second challenge was the golf ball drop. The teams were given the same materials except replacing the egg with a golf ball and given three extra pieces of paper and stirring sticks. In this challenge, the teams were attempting to build a structure on the side of the lockers that kept their golf ball above the ground for as long as possible.

The last challenge was a timed relay. In this challenge, a mini race track made out of tape was paved out in Mr. Schneider’s corner of the science wing, and by using wooden sticks, the teams were tasked with guiding a heavy metal ball through the racetrack in as short of time as possible

For the week leading up to tryouts the science wing was buzzing with excitement, From students forming teams to teachers like Mr. Joquemans promoting a promise of free pizza and drinks so it was no surprise that on the day of tryouts dozens of students flooded into the science wing to try their hand at the fun challenges. Now that the challenges have been completed and the list has been posted, Mr. Joquemans and his team of students are ready to compete in this year’s Physics Olympics! The competition takes place at the end of February, and Mr. Joquemans and the school are hoping to bring home a new winning trophy! Years of Physics Olympics! The competition takes place at the end of February, and Mr. Joquemans and the school are hoping to bring home a new winning trophy! So it was no surprise that on the day of tryouts dozens of students flooded into the science wing to try their hand at the fun challenges. Now that the trials have been completed and the list has been posted, Mr. Joquemans and his team of students are ready to compete in this year’s Physics Olympics! The competition takes place at the end of February, and Mr. Joquemans and the school are hoping to bring home a new winning trophy!

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The Physics Olympics