What did Towson students think of the PSAT?

What did Towson students think of the PSAT?

Compiled by Maura Pannebecker

Candice Tranks, sophomore Advice to students taking it next year: “Don’t really worry about it because you most likely will do well.”
Candice Tranks, sophomore
Advice to students taking it next year: “Don’t really worry about it because you most likely will do well.”
Avi Kahn, junior “Math was dirt easy, but the writing… the vocabulary is always too hard.”
Avi Kahn, junior
“Math was dirt easy, but the writing… the vocabulary is always too hard.”
Aldrich Defiono, freshman “There were too many words I didn’t understand.”
Aldrich Defino, freshman
“There were too many words I didn’t understand.”
Shraddha Gopakumar, junior “Analyzing the passages was the hardest part.”
Shraddha Gopakumar, junior
“Analyzing the passages was the hardest part.”
Kyle del Puerto, freshman “I skipped pretty much everything I didn’t learn in math.”
Kyle del Puerto, freshman
“I skipped pretty much everything I didn’t learn in math.”
John Otieno, senior “I’m glad I didn’t have to take them!”
John Otieno, senior
“I’m glad I didn’t have to take them!”
Emily Friesher, freshman “PSAT stands for Pain, Suffering, And Tears.”
Emily Friesher, freshman
“PSAT stands for Pain, Suffering, And Tears.”
Dianni Rice, sophomore “The only difficulty was the time frame.”
Dianni Rice, sophomore
“The only difficulty was the time frame.”
Celia Roulet, junior “The cursive was pretty challenging…and the math too.”
Celia Roulet, junior
“The cursive was pretty challenging…and the math too.”
Basile Moreau, sophomore “It was hard to focus for a long period of time.”
Basile Moreau, sophomore
“It was hard to focus for a long period of time.”