The modern day black Bonnie and Clyde

Kayla Tingley, Editor

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Queen and Slim, a screenplay by Lena Waithe and Melina Matsoukas, is in theaters now and it is a movie that every single person in the world should see. When watching this movie, there’s no other word to describe it other than it messes with your brain.  

The best way critics have explained the plot is the “modern-day black Bonnie and Clyde.” 

The film is centered around a couple on a first date, who get pulled over for a minor traffic violation. The Ohio cop pulls them over and is obviously racist, getting angry at Slim’s polite words. The officer check’s Slim’s car (only finding sneakers) but ends up shooting Queen in the leg, and Slim ends up killing the racist officer. The couple ends up on the run from the police for about six days, and the movie follows their journey.  

Daniel Kaluuya (Get Out) and new actress Jodie Turner-Smith star in the film as the couple, who do a beautiful portrayal of Queen and Slim.  

The movie has many important themes that bring current issues to life. Such as police brutality, race, love, betrayal, etc. Watching these themes take on a role human is the most important character in the film.  

Queen’s character is an attorney and has a very lawyer like attitude, which plays a huge part in how the night with the cop plays out. While Slim’s character is more laid back, a God centered optimistic man.  

Watching the movie brings a vast amount of humanity to police brutality, which is why it is an important movie to watch. You sit in the movie as every gunshot plays out, cringing, as your jaw drops.  

Throughout the film Queen and Slim encounter many characters that help them, but don’t always have the best intentions, which keeps the audience on their toes.  

John Anderson from The Washington Post calls the film “A road-movie/revenge fantasy destined to be the most polarizing movie of a polarized year.”  

The film highlights the issues and situations of police brutality in a beautiful way, making it a movie that is hard to watch, yet completely necessary to see.